Do you feel like it would be nice to make an extra buck in dive jobs?

As a PADI divemaster for nearly two years, my income was not really high.

At the beginning, I had no idea how to increase that cash coming into my pocket. I learned from other instructors and different business owners over time.

Read on to learn what might also work for you.

A white neon in the shape of the dollar sign at night
Photo by Jimi Filipovski from Unsplash

Work in an area with high salaries at least once in your dive career

Working in Australia gave me a peace of mind because my bank account was looking much better afterwards.

From the experience of my dive buddies working on white boats and on the Maldives is also a way to fill up your bank account.

However, all of those areas have their pros and cons and it is well worth having a deeper look into that before you go for it.

In all cases you need to find a way to stand out between all the 300 other dive professionals going for the same dive job.

Take the money from someone else

There are more people than your boss who are happy to give you their money if you offer value in exchange.

Long story short if you don’t like the word selling make sure you don’t just “sell” anything.

You want to offer value, fun and memorable experiences. People will throw money at you if you learn how to do that.

turtle_swimming
Photo by Jeremy Bishop on Unsplash

Who can I offer value to?

Your colleagues and the guests. Your colleagues probably will give their money rather to someone else I believe.

Make your guests happy

It seemed my diving guests liked me more from the moment I gave them a locally made bracelet for free. Just as a memory for diving with me. It did not matter that it was a super simple one.

bracelet
Beautifully simple bracelet — Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Freebies

Who does not like freebies?

My guests got a nice little memory from me. For them, this matters because they probably have such a holiday only once or twice per year. Especially locally made gifts are appreciated.

Have you heard of the law of reciprocity?

The Law of Reciprocity — it basically says that when someone does something nice for you, you will have a deep-rooted psychological urge to do something nice in return. As a matter of fact, you may even reciprocate with a gesture far more generous than their original good deed.

-Quoted from Gary, on Reboot Authentic

bracelet_pineapple
Photo by Marvin Meyer on Unsplash

Offer something nice of high quality

During the dives, you probably have seen amazing marine life. I hope for you at least.

The guests are super stoked about this.

Offer marine animals as jewellry at the end of a diving day. There is a good chance they will be excited to get this souvenir because it shows their personal memories.

In this moment they are really happy and it is special for them. They had fun and you offer the value of a memorable souvenir.

At the same time you support a local business by buying their products for your diving guests. Your margin will be your secret of course.

Examples are

  • Carved wood
  • Silver necklaces
  • Anything from local traditional handicrafts

tigershark

Tigershark

turtle

Turtle with movable flippers

manta_ray
Manta Pendant
Photos by Baruna Silver, Jewellery of the Seven Seas in Indonesia (No, this is not an affiliate link)

Another important factor I learned is to wear yourself what you offer.

On liveaboards and in dive shops this has shown very good acceptance. Especially as a couple.



Takeaway

Dependent on the scale you are doing it this can give you more than a hundred Euros extra per month.

If you make 1000 Euro per month from the dive shop and get 100 Euros extra means you increase your salary by a nice 10%.

Tomorrow, talk to your dive resort if you are ok to go for it.

Somebody else can pick up this opportunity soon in your dive shop and you could miss out.

Very Imortant: Never do anything that is against the local law.


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Originally published at Scubacareer.net.